New Bill Gives FTC More Power for Investigations and Fines

The recent FTC fines and microscope focused on privacy continues to create an environment for new legal processes and regulations. Recently a few senators have introduced a new bill that gives the FTC move flexibility to investigate big tech companies and levy heavy fines. The full article from Gizmodo can be found here.

Credit: Charlie Neibergall (AP)

Here are a few key takeaways from the article:

“The two Democrats call it the “Monopolization Deterrence Act,” Reuters reported. This legislation would grant the Department of Justice and Federal Trade Commission the ability to levy civil penalties when companies break antitrust law, up to 15 percent of the company’s total U.S. revenue or 30 percent of its U.S. revenue in affected markets.”

“Our legislation would empower our antitrust watchdogs with new tools to deter monopolization of market power and hold bad actors accountable,” Blumenthal said in an emailed statement to Gizmodo. “American consumers and workers are being crushed by corporate consolidation, and our outdated laws have failed to keep pace with our modern economy.”

It will be interesting to see if these fines continue how business practices will evolve over time. One specific area around the Right to Erasure is one to watch closely.

For digital marketer and legal teams, the greatest hurdle may be the “Right to Erasure/Deletion” function itself.  Contemporary organizations are searching for a module-based solution such as RIVN to step up to meet this need with an easy to use SaaS-based single function that allows brands worldwide to meet business needs and be ready for what is next.

To learn more about RIVN and RIVN Delete option please visit https://www.rivnco.com/products/

To learn more about regulations mentioned above please see the following links below:

Australian Consumer Privacy Rights and COPPA

Recently the Financial Review published an article that can be found here that highlights some comments from Innovation Summit regarding consumer privacy rights. Richard Wise, the CEO of WiseTech, spoke on several topics including privacy, workforce automation, and specifically child privacy rights.

Credit: Peter Braig

Here are some key excerpts from Wise’s comments:

“I think no regulation is bad, and also heavy regulation is bad … but ultimately one thing we should agree on is that we should protect our children, up until a reasonable age, (given) they don’t understand what privacy is, why they should have it and how they should delegate it.

“Companies that use your personal data should be telling you in great detail when they are using that your data, what they are using it for and when they … try to monetize it some way that is not part of their original intent, they should tell you about the change, and they should do it ‘opt in’, not ‘opt out’.”

It is inevitable that Australia will start developing laws similar to COPPA laws already established in the USA. The Australian government is also working towards enabling a right to be forgotten law. For digital marketer and legal teams, the greatest hurdle may be the “Right to Erasure/Deletion” function itself.  Contemporary organizations are searching for a module-based solution such as RIVN to step up to meet this need with an easy to use SaaS-based single function that allows brands worldwide to meet business needs and be ready for what is next.

To learn more about RIVN and RIVN Delete option please visit https://www.rivnco.com/products/

To learn more about regulations mentioned above please see the following links below:

Australian Customers Want Transparency on Privacy

Australia is starting to blaze a trail when it comes to consumer privacy. After the GDPR and released last year and CCPA coming up in a few months. The Australian retail ecosystem is taken notices and preparing for what is next.  The full article from Inside Retail can be found here.

Credit: https://www.insideretail.com.au

Here are a few key takeaways from the article:

“Australia’s Online Privacy Law requires organizations to “clearly express policies” on the management of their customers’ personal information. Organizations are also required to let their customers know what type of personal data they collect, for what purpose, and how the data is collected.”

“Fifty-three per cent of respondents in our survey say they only purchase with the online retailers they trust. About 26 per cent say they look into a retailer’s background and online reviews before buying and 26 per cent say they do not sign up for newsletters as frequently. Many also regularly clear their browsing history, and some use a VPN, all to prevent companies from tracking their online activities. Some even claim that the concern has made them purchase with only online retailers that have a physical store.

According to the study, 43 percent do not like retailers sending them personalized emails based on their previous shopping behaviour because they feel that the companies are tracking their movements. Twenty-six percent are open to receiving personalised emails because they reduce the number of irrelevant emails

The Australian government is also working towards enabling a right to be forgotten law. For digital marketer and legal teams, the greatest hurdle may be the “Right to Erasure/Deletion” function itself.  Contemporary organizations are searching for a module-based solution such as RIVN to step up to meet this need with an easy to use SaaS-based single function that allows brands worldwide to meet business needs and be ready for what is next.

To learn more about RIVN and RIVN Delete option please visit https://www.rivnco.com/products/

To learn more about regulations mentioned above please see the following links below:

Australian Right to be Forgotten

In a recent study “sponsored by the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network (ACCAN), the researchers from UTS and Western Sydney University found there was no clear or consistent approach to the disclosure of personal data”.  This is critical on several levels. First, no standardization is in place today. Second, it shows the government is actively looking to solve this problem for its citizens. The full article from IT News can be found here.

Credit: https://www.itnews.com.au

The article cites a key piece of legislation which is Consumer Data Right (found here) will help standardize data access and transfer in Australia. In addition, researchers cited the GDPR as a standard for customer rights standard. Including this quote:

“The European Union has introduced a foundational reform that provides citizens with a range of rights, including a right to be forgotten and a right to access data”

The Australian government is also working towards enabling a right to be forgotten law. For digital marketer and legal teams the greatest hurdle may be the “Right to Erasure/Deletion” function itself.  Contemporary organizations are searching for a module based solutions such as RIVN to step up to meet this need with an easy to use SaaS based single function that allows brands worldwide to meet business needs and be ready for what is next.

To learn more about RIVN and RIVN Delete option please visit https://www.rivnco.com/products/

To learn more about regulations mentioned above please see the following links below:

Australia Set to Police Google and Facebook

Australia is trying to learn from other countries across the globe including Europe and the US to develop a platform that will help protect their citizens privacy while monitoring big tech companies. A recent Reuters article found here highlights Australia strategy including establishing the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) which would be “…the antitrust watchdog, to scrutinize how the companies used algorithms to match advertisements with viewers, giving them a stronghold on the main income generator of media operators.” 

This commission would be focused on Facebook and Google in particular.

Here is an excerpt from this article:
“lift the veil” on the closely guarded algorithms the firms use to collect and monetize users’ data, and accepted the ACCC’s “overriding conclusion that there is a need for reform”.

The article goes on further to discuss 5 existing investigations into the big tech companies with more to come.

To learn more about regulations mentioned above please see the following links below: